sometimes it makes you ____
Reading about "The great 1980s Dungeons and Dragons panic" made me remember Ron Tran’s fantastic It Knows Not What It Is exhibition at Charles H. Scott. Read a review by Kari Cwynar for whitehot magazine. 

Reading about "The great 1980s Dungeons and Dragons panic" made me remember Ron Tran’s fantastic It Knows Not What It Is exhibition at Charles H. Scott. Read a review by Kari Cwynar for whitehot magazine


Ann Veronica Janssens, Magic Mirror Pink, 2013. "First lines, like first dates, or the first bite of dessert, can be deceptive," curated by Christine Messineo at Bortolami Gallery.
via Mousse Magazine.

Ann Veronica Janssens, Magic Mirror Pink, 2013.
"First lines, like first dates, or the first bite of dessert, can be deceptive," curated by Christine Messineo at Bortolami Gallery.

via Mousse Magazine.


» The Infinite White Abyss, exhibiting at Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen

"The white surface played a crucial role for all three artists. In Malevich’s paintings, the white background is a void before which his geometric shapes seem to float. White was for Malevich non-objectivity in utmost perfection –evoking the ideal of a positively evolving society. With great enthusiasm, he urged his fellow artists in 1919 to “swim in the white free abyss, infinity is before you”. For Wassily Kandinsky, the white field symbolises a world in which all colours have vanished. White, according to Kandinsky, “affects our psyche like a silence of great magnitude…. This is not a dead silence. It is full of potential.” Piet Mondrian’s panel paintings, with their juxtaposition of the primary colours red, yellow and blue with the non-colours white, black and grey, express a longing for universal harmony.

Numerous exhibitions have been devoted over the years to the work of these important avant-garde artists – but now the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen is for the first time showing at the K20 works from the years 1909 to 1941 selected specifically for their handling of the colour white. The exhibition will in addition examine in detail the influences to which the three artists were subjected in their day, conveying these by way of interdisciplinary presentations. 

Based on the artistic concepts of the three avant-garde painters, the contemporary artist Olafur Eliasson is developing in conjunction with the Kunstsammlung a room designed to rensensitise viewers and prepare them in a surprising way for the exhibition while permanently raising their awareness of the complex perceptual and material qualities of white”


Jack Bush, Untitled, 1965.

Jack Bush, Untitled, 1965.


Future Islands - Lighthouse (with blistering eye contact)


christopherschreck:

speaking of Landon, I put together an online presentation of “True Translation,” the text I wrote on his practice a few months back - you can check that out HERE

"Neither simplistic nor conservative, the willful appeal of these paintings reads to me as at once functional and, within the current climate, provocative, an overt argument for how we might more meaningfully engage with works of art.”Oh man, such a lovely essay.

christopherschreck:

speaking of Landon, I put together an online presentation of “True Translation,” the text I wrote on his practice a few months back - you can check that out HERE

"Neither simplistic nor conservative, the willful appeal of these paintings reads to me as at once functional and, within the current climate, provocative, an overt argument for how we might more meaningfully engage with works of art.”

Oh man, such a lovely essay.


christopherschreck:

painting by Jonas Wood, featuring pots by Shio Kusaka

christopherschreck:

painting by Jonas Wood, featuring pots by Shio Kusaka


Henri Matisse, The Goldfish, 1910.

Henri Matisse, The Goldfish, 1910.


bofransson:

Pierre Boncompain (French, b. 1938) 
La nappe broée

bofransson:

Pierre Boncompain (French, b. 1938) 

La nappe broée

(via jesuisperdu)


"One of the devices I’ve been reading about recently is the Claude glass, typically a convex black mirror, which was popular in the 19th century among tourists and painters. Tourists used it to enhance their experience of viewing the landscape, the idea being that it made the world look more like a Claude Lorrain painting.  Artists used it because it reduced objects onto a flat plane that was easier to translate into painting, much like reference photographs do. The Claude glass also has a clear relationship to Instagram. I often see people tagging photos, particularly landscape photos reminiscent of picturesque or luminist painting, #nofilter, although the camera, or painting, will always be a mediating, reductive, and filtering device.” "Mirror Stage: An Interview with Conor Backman" by Stephanie Cristello at New American Paintings.Many nice connections/references raised in this conversation.

"One of the devices I’ve been reading about recently is the Claude glass, typically a convex black mirror, which was popular in the 19th century among tourists and painters. Tourists used it to enhance their experience of viewing the landscape, the idea being that it made the world look more like a Claude Lorrain painting.  Artists used it because it reduced objects onto a flat plane that was easier to translate into painting, much like reference photographs do. The Claude glass also has a clear relationship to Instagram. I often see people tagging photos, particularly landscape photos reminiscent of picturesque or luminist painting, #nofilter, although the camera, or painting, will always be a mediating, reductive, and filtering device.”
 
"Mirror Stage: An Interview with Conor Backman" by Stephanie Cristello at New American Paintings.

Many nice connections/references raised in this conversation.











Ruth Skinner (http://ruthskinner.com)

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