sometimes it makes you ____
I’m happy to announce a curatorial collaboration with critic A.D. Coleman will open this coming Friday at The Petrified Forest Gallery here in London. I’ve curated a small reading room space in the gallery, and Coleman will be making appearances throughout the month of June via video chat for open discussions and panel talks. Here’s the announcement:A.D. Coleman is a world-renowned writer, critic, lecturer, curator, and teacher. Prolific and multifaceted, engaged and controversial, Coleman is the author of eight books and over two thousand essays on photography criticism and related subject matter. Reading Room extends Coleman’s online seminars in practical criticism by providing a physical library space to inhabit and explore. Visitors are encouraged to participate actively in the space and its discussions, engaging critically with both a selection of Coleman’s writings and a curated collection of associated literary and critical texts, art-historical surveys, and photography monographs. Visitors are invited to converse with Coleman face-to-face via video chat in a series of active dialogues regarding photography scholarship and education, the roles and expectations of the museum and the art institution, the trajectory of art criticism and Coleman’s own  career as a critic, and his tactical decisions as a writer. These discussions are open-ended and intended to foster in all participants a critical awareness of their reading and the development of strategies for their own writing. For educators, the Reading Room is also a space to discuss teaching methods.    Reading Room will also host a series of mini-exhibitions, performances, and discussion panels throughout the month of June by London-based artists. Check https://www.facebook.com/ReadingRoomADColeman for up-to-date announcements and events listings, or email readingroomlibrary@gmail.com for more details. Coleman has written for The Village Voice, The New York Times, New York Observer, ARTnews, and Art on Paper. Coleman’s honours include the J Dudley Johnston Award for lifetime achievement in writing about photography, awarded by the Royal Photographic Society (UK) in 2010. Coleman is also a pioneer of internet-based criticism, having founded The Nearby Café (nearbycafe.com) in 1995. The additional websites he now publishes include  The Photography Criticism CyberArchive (photocriticism.com) and both The New Eyes Project (k12photoed.org) and Teaching Photography (teachingphoto.com), two significant resources for furthering photography education. Coleman also regularly contributes work to his personal blog, Photocritic International (photocritic.com). “A lot of contemporary writing about photography, about media, etc. particularly post-modern writing is highly jargonized, very very dense, and in my experience very off-putting and difficult to get into, especially for undergraduates. … I have found that by going to other kinds of presentations of those writers’ ideas whether that’s interviews, conversations, etcetera, whether it’s in print or in some kind of video format, or even audio format the writers are often more likely to unpack their ideas. … That material is often more accessible.” A.D. Coleman, VASA Seminar, 2012

I’m happy to announce a curatorial collaboration with critic A.D. Coleman will open this coming Friday at The Petrified Forest Gallery here in London. I’ve curated a small reading room space in the gallery, and Coleman will be making appearances throughout the month of June via video chat for open discussions and panel talks. Here’s the announcement:

A.D. Coleman is a world-renowned writer, critic, lecturer, curator, and teacher. Prolific and multifaceted, engaged and controversial, Coleman is the author of eight books and over two thousand essays on photography criticism and related subject matter. Reading Room extends Coleman’s online seminars in practical criticism by providing a physical library space to inhabit and explore. Visitors are encouraged to participate actively in the space and its discussions, engaging critically with both a selection of Coleman’s writings and a curated collection of associated literary and critical texts, art-historical surveys, and photography monographs. Visitors are invited to converse with Coleman face-to-face via video chat in a series of active dialogues regarding photography scholarship and education, the roles and expectations of the museum and the art institution, the trajectory of art criticism and Coleman’s own  career as a critic, and his tactical decisions as a writer. These discussions are open-ended and intended to foster in all participants a critical awareness of their reading and the development of strategies for their own writing. For educators, the Reading Room is also a space to discuss teaching methods.  

Reading Room will also host a series of mini-exhibitions, performances, and discussion panels throughout the month of June by London-based artists. Check https://www.facebook.com/ReadingRoomADColeman for up-to-date announcements and events listings, or email readingroomlibrary@gmail.com for more details.

Coleman has written for The Village Voice, The New York Times, New York Observer, ARTnews, and Art on Paper. Coleman’s honours include the J Dudley Johnston Award for lifetime achievement in writing about photography, awarded by the Royal Photographic Society (UK) in 2010. Coleman is also a pioneer of internet-based criticism, having founded The Nearby Café (nearbycafe.com) in 1995. The additional websites he now publishes include  The Photography Criticism CyberArchive (photocriticism.com) and both The New Eyes Project (k12photoed.org) and Teaching Photography (teachingphoto.com), two significant resources for furthering photography education. Coleman also regularly contributes work to his personal blog, Photocritic International (photocritic.com).

“A lot of contemporary writing about photography, about media, etc. particularly post-modern writing is highly jargonized, very very dense, and in my experience very off-putting and difficult to get into, especially for undergraduates. … I have found that by going to other kinds of presentations of those writers’ ideas whether that’s interviews, conversations, etcetera, whether it’s in print or in some kind of video format, or even audio format the writers are often more likely to unpack their ideas. … That material is often more accessible.”
A.D. Coleman, VASA Seminar, 2012


Congrats to Knauf & Brown for a beautiful looking booth at New York Design Week. There are too many nice things to look at in this photo essay. Photo by MIKE VORRASI, via Sight Unseen.

Congrats to Knauf & Brown for a beautiful looking booth at New York Design Week. There are too many nice things to look at in this photo essay. Photo by MIKE VORRASI, via Sight Unseen.


New Arrivals: No Party Books

orbookstore:

image

No Party is a publishing collective that was, at one point, based in Vancouver. They produce stunning books of photographs. Right now we have Ruth Skinner’s Heads of Education and Alexa Kirsten Stroth’s Three Quarries. More on the way!

Heads of Education: $15, softcover

Three Quarries: $20, softcover

more pictures below!

Read More

No Party is (at least temporarily) scattered to the winds, but some of our books are currently available for purchase at Or Gallery’s bookstore in Vancouver.
Thanks, Or! <3 <3 <3


Reading about "The great 1980s Dungeons and Dragons panic" made me remember Ron Tran&#8217;s fantastic It Knows Not What It Is exhibition at Charles H. Scott. Read a review by Kari Cwynar for whitehot magazine. 

Reading about "The great 1980s Dungeons and Dragons panic" made me remember Ron Tran’s fantastic It Knows Not What It Is exhibition at Charles H. Scott. Read a review by Kari Cwynar for whitehot magazine


Ann Veronica Janssens, Magic Mirror Pink, 2013. "First lines, like first dates, or the first bite of dessert, can be deceptive," curated by Christine Messineo at Bortolami Gallery.
via Mousse Magazine.

Ann Veronica Janssens, Magic Mirror Pink, 2013.
"First lines, like first dates, or the first bite of dessert, can be deceptive," curated by Christine Messineo at Bortolami Gallery.

via Mousse Magazine.


» The Infinite White Abyss, exhibiting at Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen

"The white surface played a crucial role for all three artists. In Malevich’s paintings, the white background is a void before which his geometric shapes seem to float. White was for Malevich non-objectivity in utmost perfection –evoking the ideal of a positively evolving society. With great enthusiasm, he urged his fellow artists in 1919 to “swim in the white free abyss, infinity is before you”. For Wassily Kandinsky, the white field symbolises a world in which all colours have vanished. White, according to Kandinsky, “affects our psyche like a silence of great magnitude…. This is not a dead silence. It is full of potential.” Piet Mondrian’s panel paintings, with their juxtaposition of the primary colours red, yellow and blue with the non-colours white, black and grey, express a longing for universal harmony.

Numerous exhibitions have been devoted over the years to the work of these important avant-garde artists – but now the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen is for the first time showing at the K20 works from the years 1909 to 1941 selected specifically for their handling of the colour white. The exhibition will in addition examine in detail the influences to which the three artists were subjected in their day, conveying these by way of interdisciplinary presentations. 

Based on the artistic concepts of the three avant-garde painters, the contemporary artist Olafur Eliasson is developing in conjunction with the Kunstsammlung a room designed to rensensitise viewers and prepare them in a surprising way for the exhibition while permanently raising their awareness of the complex perceptual and material qualities of white”


Jack Bush, Untitled, 1965.

Jack Bush, Untitled, 1965.


Future Islands - Lighthouse (with blistering eye contact)


christopherschreck:

speaking of Landon, I put together an online presentation of “True Translation,” the text I wrote on his practice a few months back - you can check that out HERE

"Neither simplistic nor conservative, the willful appeal of these paintings reads to me as at once functional and, within the current climate, provocative, an overt argument for how we might more meaningfully engage with works of art.&#8221;Oh man, such a lovely essay.

christopherschreck:

speaking of Landon, I put together an online presentation of “True Translation,” the text I wrote on his practice a few months back - you can check that out HERE

"Neither simplistic nor conservative, the willful appeal of these paintings reads to me as at once functional and, within the current climate, provocative, an overt argument for how we might more meaningfully engage with works of art.”

Oh man, such a lovely essay.


christopherschreck:

painting by Jonas Wood, featuring pots by Shio Kusaka

christopherschreck:

painting by Jonas Wood, featuring pots by Shio Kusaka











Ruth Skinner (http://ruthskinner.com)

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